Comments & Answers

 

 

May 21, 2019

Jesse Stewart - We would like to schedule a meeting with you and the engineering design team to discuss alternative engineering. We want a smaller, less intrusive footprint and we believe we have modern engineering that will provide a smaller footprint. We also do not want the noise of the above ground pump and we believe the water department should be willing to discuss the alternatives. PLEASE MEET WITH US.

Vickey Walker 

May 20, 2019

The last comment that received a response was April 10, 2019. That was forty days ago.

Alan . Walker

May 18, 2019

Public Utilities, stop ignoring the public demand for an alternative site. The proposed structure is absolutely inappropriate for the historic area. As a property owner on Canyon Road, I was required to go through a lengthy approval process with the city to add a wooden fence and gate at the rear of the apartment building as it is 'an historic neighborhood'. I was happy to comply as I recognized this neighorhood is of significant value to the community at large. The entire metropolitan area uses this lovely Memory Grove park, not just the surrounding residents. It is a city jewel. It has been a place of rememberance for the veterans since 1924.

 

This area was one of the first encampments of the Mormon pioneers in 1847. The well project is at the base of the Grove and the proposed well project area is part and parcel to the spirit of the park. REALLY, this is the BEST place you can find to build this water treatment facility?! PLEASE don't ruin this beautiful part of our city. 

Janet Gleave

May 12, 2019

“Think Globally, act Locally.” Most of us have heard that phrase. Today, I am acting as locally as I can, to preserve a premier green space in Salt Lake City, from my bedroom window. While my son naps next to me, I count the number of people passing the location of the proposed 4th Avenue Well Pump House. It is a typical, busy Saturday afternoon on a beautiful spring day. City Creek Park defines “verdant” from the wet winter we had. The leaves of the 110 year old sycamores are that bright neon green you see only in spring, before summer toughens them. People are walking, with friends and family, dogs, one bird. They pass on scooters, both electric and foot powered, bicycles, skateboards. Some run. Some stop by the creek in the shade. 174 people in one hour. Multiply that by 10 hours, 9:00 AM to 7:00 PM, 1740 people.

 

That’s a good guess for the day, though the early runners are out before 6:00 am, and the party goers and couples on dates wander through the park into the wee hours of the night. This year there are thirty weekends from April through October, prime visitation to the City Creek/Memory Grove area. Multiply 1740 by 60, to account for both Saturday and Sunday, to reach 104,400 people on the weekends. Half of 174 is 87, an approximation for those passing the well on a weekday during these months. Multiply that by the days of the week (5) then 30 weeks, and that is another 130,500 people visiting on weekdays. Together, that is an estimated 234,900 visitors in six months.

 

The population of Salt Lake City is estimated at 200,544 people, so this could mean visitation to this pump house site exceeds the entire population of Salt Lake City in a six-month period. I find my voice in this argument in response to Council Woman Erin Mendenhall’s comments from the Salt Lake Tribune Article “Plans to modernize a well don’t flow well with residents” on April 30th. Her concern is over equity, and whether other public utilities projects in other districts would receive the same amount of money to create attractive buildings. I hope Public Utilities listens to all residents in all Salt Lake City districts, and tailors projects to what neighbors want and expect. Moreover, I hope this letter makes the point that the 4th Avenue proposed pump house is not just another project in any neighborhood; its presence would forever alter an extremely popular, high profile and historic recreation area. Therefore, the proposed 4th Ave. Well Pump House project deserves more thought and investment than most public utility projects.

 

I have only lived here two years, and countless times passers by have told us how fortunate we are to reside on this street; even marathon runners express their adoration of the neighborhood as the zoom past in early April. With this great fortune comes the responsibility to “act locally”, by taking action to preserve this green treasure at the heart of our beautiful city. I urge Public Utilities and our elected officials to a) move the well to a lower profile area and b) consider how the current plans affect all of Salt Lake City residents, not just those who live in the neighborhood. Please do not make a mistake that will outlive all of us; let’s do this the right way, for all the visitors of City Creek Canyon now and in the future.

Catherine Seiler

 

May 12, 2019

The residents of Memory Grove are concerned with the look and feel that the pump house adds to our neighborhood. We feel that the current design looks modern and boxy and is not representative of the feel of our neighborhood. The red brick draws attention to itself and does not blend in. The proposed plan with combination stone and brick misses the mark. Those of us who live in Memory Grove find the stone of the riverbeds and bridges in the park very comforting. If this project must move forward, please consider an all stone exterior that would complement the stone features the park already has. Google "stone pump house" to see some beautiful historical pump houses. If done correctly, the pump house could be quite charming.

Concerned Resident

 

May, 10, 2019

Hello, My parents own an apartment complex in the Memory Grove neighborhood right across the street from the park in Canyon Road. I’ve come to this area to visit my grandmother in their building all my life, and within this last year I’ve also become a resident there. Seeing the plans for the new water treatment facility across the street and speaking with neighbors and park goers, it is clear that this is not a wanted development in our beautiful city park.

 

This development would not only significantly impact the existing residents, but more importantly individuals from all over the city. People come here to use the green space (believe me, I know it’s spring when parking becomes scarce). Frankly the design and scale of the facility is jarring. I understand an already functioning treatment facility exists underground, but surely there is a more reasonable place to house the above ground facility. The issue goes beyond aesthetic of the neighborhood, although I think the park adds to resident property value. So many of our city’s residents actually use this green space, and have for a long time. Us, and you, should feel responsible for protecting our city’s history. I hope you’ll truly consider the impact of this facility to the adjacent residents and those who come through the area, and plan for better placement of an above ground chemical treatment development.

Franny

 

 

May 9, 2019

I am opposed to the proposed plan for the Fourth Avenue Well site. With such limited space in the avenues for parks, and quiet places, I don't feel the city should be considering building and above ground treatment facility in the heart of a neighborhood. You would be making a peaceful, beautiful section of town an ugly sore that would be unpleasant to walk by, yet alone live by. This would likely depreciate values of the homes in the adjacent areas. I understand we need to address the safety concerns, and make needed updates, but building a new above ground facility is not a good option. Raise taxes, spend more money, and move the site!

Jason Mcafee

 

 

May 9, 2019

Please don’t put the 4th Avenue well in and tear down 100 year old trees as well as put the neighborhoods health and at risk, and take up space regularly used for after school activities for kids, picnics and dog walking in a busy neighborhood area. A toxic well doesn’t belong in this busy family neighborhood or any neighborhood for that matter.

Lizzie Bosen

 

 

May 9, 2019

Hi, I am a currently residing across the street from the where the treatment center is being considered. I am writing to express my disagreement with the current plans. I am nine months pregnant and plan to raise my son here. I am not in support of cutting down some of the largest trees in our view but am very concerned about my son and other kids in the neighborhood being exposed to chemicals. We chose this location because of its historic beauty as well as the charm that all of the nature around gives to our lives. So many people enjoy coming here to escape into nature and for a peaceful experience and have been doing so for years. My family is deeply saddened by what these plans mean and how it will change the whole feeling of our day to day living. Please reconsider putting this center somewhere else.

Brittney Wiseman

 

 

May 7, 2019

My comment is regarding proposed construction on the Fourth Avenue Well site. My understanding is that information about the proposed construction was initially only to residents within a few hundred feet of the park. I believe that the propose project has much wider impact and should be widely discussed. I frequently walk along city creek from State Street through Memory Grove and up into the canyon. This urban-to-wilderness corridor is wonderful and unique characteristic of Salt Lake City. As a regular park user, I can attest that the City Creek corridor is used not just by local residents but also by many people who work downtown or who travel from other parts of the city. Construction of an industrial facility at the Fourth Avenue well location will adversely affect the historic, cultural, and recreational value of the specific pocket park location and also of the whole City Creek corridor.

Carol Sweeney

May 6, 2019

The design of the proposed Fourth Avenue Pumphouse includes use of a 450HP 3800 GPM Vertical Turbine Lineshaft Pump. It is my understanding that the current pump in use is an electric submersible with top of pump at 270’ well depth. The existing electric submersible pump is for all intents silent to park visitors and residents, and causes no vibration. The proposed design utilizing a 450 HP 3800 GPM Vertical Turbine Lineshaft Pump has several noted concerns: Noise; Vibration; and C) Increasing the height of the building. With this 450 HP size pump/motor, noise is a concern, as well as potential vibration issues with the discharge head and motor aboveground arrangement, especially with a variable speed arrangement if a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the above-ground structure is not performed. A lineshaft pump is more complex in than it has more moving components, since the shaft extends the length of the well and must be stabilized with bearings at specified intervals. Submersible pumps however, are generally silent (as is the case with the pump currently installed in the well), and do not produce vibrations at the surface. In addition, not having a pump motor in mounted atop the well head, and within the pumphouse, may remove the need for at least one of the planned HVAC units as well as the need for soundproofing of the building. A submersible turbine pump is also less complex than a lineshaft pump since the pump and motor are direct-coupled. Since an electric submersible pump is currently installed, SLCPU has experience with its maintenance, and has found either the frequency and/or cost of pulling the submersible pump acceptable. Xylem Goulds Type VIS submersible turbine pump can use a low profile discharge head or pitless adapter, and be NSF61 certified for a freshwater drinking well. This type pump, and other electric submersible pumps are capable of meeting the specifications of this proposed Fourth Avenue Well: lifting 4700 gpm off of 480V, from a well with 20” ID well casing. Specific contacts to electric submersible pumps can be provided to SLCPU upon request.

Winston Seiler

May 6, 2019

Regarding the Fourth Avenue Well Assessment authored by David Hansen, Ph.D., P.E., I find the Pros and Cons lacking in breadth of issues considered for many of the categories, but would like to comment specifically on the Pros and Cons outlined for Option 4, “Bury the Flow Meter.” The first caveat is to assume that the same mechanical flow meter included in the most current plans — requiring inflow and outflow lengths of pipes — is to remain as a design element as opposed to a modern mass flow type meter such as a Coriolis Effect Meter, Magnetic Flow Meter, Ultrasonic Flowmeter or similar (which can provide accuracy of about 0.1%). Utilizing a modern, high accuracy mass flow meter can be installed inside the pump house and would remove the need for inflow and outflow lengths of pipes — and have the same net effect of placing the mechanical flow meter in buried section of pipe between the pump house and Victory Tanner water main connection — decreasing the length of the building by approximately 12 feet or 30%. Regarding the Pro outlined for Option 4, “Bury the Flow Meter:” PRO: “Makes slight reduction in the footprint of the building but electrical panels are still required within the building.” COMMENT: Removing the flow meter and required inflow/outflow piping entirely from the pump house will remove 15’ of pipe and reduce the footprint by 30%. No evidence has been given as to why electrical panels can not be stacked, be of different smaller footprint, or on multiple walls within the building.

 

Understanding that clearances will need to be provided for workers between pipes and wall mounted electrical boxes, it appears from the design drawings, that appropriate clearances to wall mounted electrical on both the east and west sides of the building can accommodate required clearances by increasing the width of the building by only approximately 1-2’. This increase in building width can be accomplished on the west side of the building, where there is greater than ten feet of clearance between the pumphouse foundation and the buried underground storm drain. The wellhead piping can be oriented off of the well head towards the northwest and then aligned with the length of the building with a 45 degree elbow (or similar). This increased width would likely be acceptable if it allowed the length of the building to be decreased by 30%. Regarding the Cons outlined for Option 4, “Bury the Flow Meter:” CON: “Potentially would require the removal of additional trees” COMMENT: The Flow Meter would be installed along new pipe lengths that are to be dug between the pump house and the Victory Tanner Water Main. Any digging for this pipe length is going to disturb tree root structures, with or without the addition of a flow meter. CON: “The meter vault area could not be re-landscaped.” COMMENT: If a vault was required, it could be under the planned concrete wheel path (9), or under the concrete walkway (5), or under Canyon Rd., where landscaping would not be required. CON: “Vault would be considered a confined work space.” COMMENT: How often would a vault need to be entered to inspect or read a flow meter? Flow meter data can be transmitted electronically to the pump house either wirelessly or by cable for remote reading (smart utility meters are read by passing vehicles and even aircraft; oil companies in California monitor up to 50,000 wells per day from one centralized location in cases over 100 miles distant from the wells themselves). There is no need for workers to enter a vault to regularly inspect a flow meter. The risk of confined work spaces can be managed through proper Standard Operating Procedures, Job Safety Analyses, and Safe Work Practices.

 

There is no need to have regular confined space entry to read or inspect a flow meter. This risk can be realistically managed to an acceptable level. CON: “There is a risk of electrocution if lighting or other electrical equipment is needed and there is a leak within the vault while maintenance is performed.” COMMENT: There are flowmeters that are designed to function underwater. This risk can be managed to an acceptable level by flow meter selection, engineering design, Standard Operating Procedures, Job Safety Analyses, and Safe Work Practices. Lock Out/Tag Out procedures for Electrical Isolation should occur any time maintenance is performed on the flow meter, entirely removing any risk of electrocution. CON: “It is an increased inconvenience for operators to monitor and maintain a meter within a vault outside the wellhouse.” COMMENT: Any need to physically enter a vault to read a meter would be the product of antiquated engineering design. Flow meters data can easily be transmitted electronically to remote locations. Run a wire along the pipe length, and back into the pump house. If I can read a $200 Nest Thermostat on my phone, anywhere in the world, it is easily possible to monitor a flow meter without entering a vault. Regarding maintenance, a flow meter can be selected for reliability so as not to require any frequent maintenance. CON: “Requires access to two separate spaces.” COMMENT: As previously discussed, there should be no need for workers to regularly access a space to read or maintain a flow meter. CON: “Maintenance more difficult during inclement weather.” COMMENT: Though it is possible that a flow meter would need to be replaced or worked upon during inclement weather, the flow meter should not require much maintenance at all. It is my firm conviction that there are opportunities to shrink the footprint of the pumphouse significantly (with existing off the shelf technology) while including all of the design goals of public utilities.

Winston Seiler

May 3, 2019

I have DEEP opposition to this project. As a tax payer, a voter, a resident of the Avenues and a frequent visitor to Memory Grove and the off leash dog park. Please reconsider the location or at the very least, the building should blend into the environment and look authentic to the history of this park.

Tyson Boyer

April 29, 2019

I went back and reviewed the October 2018 Greater Avenues Community Council Newsletter. At the April 2019 City Council meeting the Water Department insinuated the neighborhood wasn't involved until "late in the process". I argue, the October 2018 newsletter proves that is not so. Historic Landmarks told Public Utilities to try a new design as reported in that October 2018 newsletter. The neighborhood said "TAKE THE CHEMICALS OFF-SITE" as reported in that October 2018 newsletter. It isn't that your communication is poor, it is that you IGNORE the communication provided. And as Chairman Brian Berkelback is quoted in that newsletter it is wrong "that the by-product of this project, is the potential desecration of the gateway to City Creek and Memory Grove". Leave the well, re-sleeve the well, remove the planned sodium hypochlorite storage and injection facility (sodium hypochlorite is 2.5 stronger than household chlorine bleach and known to be a respiratory irritant to those with asthma and COPD in its lesser strength). We do not want it in the neighborhood and we believe it is your duty as stewards of the citizens to protect us just as it is your duty to protect your workers. Only unlike your workers or visitors who get to go home to a different community without a sodium hypochlorite facility, we live here day in and day out and are subject to its smell, noise and dangers. IT IS WRONG to SUBJECT THE MANY HOMES AND FAMILIES TO THIS PROPOSED FACILITY.

Victoria Walker

April 26, 2019

Thank you for looking at other alternatives. This is my "back yard" as I live in a condo and depend on the park for nature therapy. We bought here specifically for this benefit and looking at the proposed building makes me sick. Please take all measures to see that both safety and aesthetics are maintained! Thank you.

Barbara 

April 24, 2019

As a long-time Avenues resident and near-daily visitor to Memory Grove, I’m writing to protest the planned water treatment facility at the entrance to the park. Removing 100-year-old trees and putting this facility at the entrance to our community’s beloved park is not an acceptable solution. Please work with our concerned citizens to find a better way—one that meets the city’s needs while protecting the integrity of this treasures place.

Kim Grob

April 16, 2019

New Designs on the installation

Thanks for posting the "Hansen" well survey and options report. Do you know when the "new" designs will be released to the public and will there be a public hearing at HLC prior to their determination? You also show "city council" comments on the milestone tab, will that be a public hearing?

Craig S. Ogan

April 13, 2019

Do it right! why not just replace the old an existing filter system instead of bringing a bulky treatment facility up to the surface? It doesn't make sense to have something like that it will not look bad in the neighborhood but the City would look bad and old fashion. The City has done a great job making SLC a nice place to live and visit (modern & beautiful). Please keep those types of projects underground!

Daniel P. Nieblas

April 12, 2019

I want to express sharp disapproval at the current plan to construct a building for bringing well-infrastructure to the surface in the fourth avenue area. Of course, meeting standard environmental and safety regulations are crucial, but protecting our public areas-- including historically ancient trees-- from development is equally important. There has got to be an alternative to building an enormous industrial rectangle in the midst of one of our city's most beautiful public spots. Our city's green areas have an innate value that the city has an imperative to respect, and there is no justification for attacking these spaces. The proposed building should never have been proposed.

Atticus Edwards

April 11, 2019

Thanks for the info--I saw the FAQs. Anything with the word chlorine in it raises hackles. Here's what google says about it (worst three words in Modern America, "I Googled it"): SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE (SOLUTION, ACTIVE CHLORINE >10%) TYPES OF HAZARD/ EXPOSURE ACUTE HAZARDS/ SYMPTOMS •SKIN Redness. Skin burns. Pain. Blisters. •EYES Redness. Pain. Severe deep burns. •INGESTION Abdominal pain. Burning sensation. Shock or collapse. Unconsciousness. Vomiting. In my neighborhood, where SLC PU is proposing the chlorine injectors, we have some mothers, who have small children and/or older asthmatic kids, whose hackles are raised.

Craig S. Ogan

April 10, 2019

In the FAQs you mention a map attachment showing where the water from the 4th Ave Well is distributed. Where will that map be found?

Craig S. Ogan

Thank you for pointing that out. The map has been added to the website. You can find it in the documents page or click on the link in the FAQ section where it is referenced.

April 10, 2019

Are there any other chlorination storage and injection systems in the Culinary Water system in Salt lake City placed in a public park in immediate proximity (with in 25 feet) of residences or schools?

Craig S. Ogan

Salt Lake City Public Utilities uses a chlorinating agent throughout its water distribution system called Sodium Hypochlorite. This is liquid, and is essentially the equivalent of double-strength household bleach. As has been stated numerous times (and explained in the FAQ section on this website), SLCPU does not use gaseous chlorine anywhere in the water treatment and distribution system, and it will not be used on 4th Avenue Well water. There are two current sites with Sodium Hypochlorite in our distribution system that share proximity with residences. One is a distance of 180 feet. The other is a distance of 175 feet.

March 31, 2019

I am very disappointed at the cities lack of creativity and concern for the general residence and neighborhood with where this proposed water treatment facility is being built. Please, please find a better way and location. Don’t destroy a beautiful and vibrant park which is such a part of the avenues.

Geoff

SLC Public Utilities continues to work with the City’s Planning Division and CRSA Architecture on appropriate design for the pump house, which is being informed by the Historic Landmark Commission and community members each step of the way. There is a good amount of additional information on the FAQ's page and on this page about the issues you have mentioned. We hope that you will find these resources helpful.

March 26, 2019

When will the report from the survey of the well be available to the public?

Craig S. Ogan

The project team is in process of finalizing the well survey report draft and will make it available on this website when it is complete.

March 22, 2019

First Things First

While the debate swirls over the design of this misbegotten facility, I believe that we are getting the cart before the horse. What we should be discussing is whether this facility is needed in the first place. I am struck by the fact that the city has operated this well for 70 years under some kind of “grandfather” exemption from regulation. That means the regulators have decided the well is doing a good job and can continue its service to the community without modification.

 

What I call a simple 'thought experiment' leads me to believe the untreated well water never reaches any kitchen taps whatsoever because it is merged with the city's treated water system within a very, very short distance from the well. No one drinks water straight from this well. This is bolstered by the fact that the well is idled between October and April due to “reduced demand.” That means that when the downtown and Rose Park customers stop watering their lawns and gardens, the well can be, and is, shut down. Nothing happens at that time, because customers continue to get the treated city water that they have been getting all along!

 

Further supporting my contention is my observation that city spokespersons have been vague about the specifics of where the well water merges with the city system, how many customers are served untreated well water ahead of that merger, and what alternatives have been seriously considered to putting this full-on chemical-laden water treatment plant in the middle of our historic and treasured Memory Grove park. Do the citizens of the city need this well? I argue not so much, because the water treatment facility is redundant. Lets get the facts about the pressing need for this facility in this very location, before we discuss how it should look.

Dave Jonsson

 

March 17, 2019

Message: As the former HazCom Officer for the UTNG the Memory Grove residents should not be subjected to the potential hazard of an accidental exposure.

Fran Marcus-MAdsen

March 11, 2019

I have been told that the operation of the pump station at 500 North and Cortez has been stalled due to legal action and has never been "turned on". Is this a motivating factor to add chlorination function in the Canyon Road Facility?

Craig S. Ogan

The pump station at 500 North and Cortez Street and the 4th Avenue well have no relation to each other. Each serves entirely different pressure zones, and customers, in the City.  There is no legal action affecting the Cortez Street station. This is what we call a “redundant” source and it only operates when we need a backup water source. So it is “turned on” when necessary. Redundancy in the water distribution system is a key priority for SLC Public Utilities, and this station helps to meet that priority. Chlorination is not at issue here.

March 7, 2019

At the Greater Avenues Community Council recently, PU officials said they were launching a study for alternatives to the Treatment Plant and it may take as much as a year. So is PU seeking a certificate of appropriateness on the building design, footprint and landscape as shown in the "up date" portion this website? If so, isn't that premature since the alternatives study is not complete?

Craig S. Ogan

SLC Public Utilities continues to work with the City’s Planning Division and CRSA Architecture on appropriate design for the pump house, which is being informed by the Historic Landmark Commission and community members each step of the way. The analysis of the well and alternatives study is not yet finalized. When it is complete, we will share it with the public on this website. Meanwhile, the teams involved in the project are proceeding with necessary tasks, including public outreach and regular communication with the Mayor and City Council.

 

March 7, 2019

Hello, Having just attended the work session at the City and County Building, I would like to leave some feedback. This isn't a request for information, simply an attempt to provide comments for your department to consider.

 

1) I am a bit mystified as to why your department/architects have interpreted residents' requests for a more "residential" building as a request for the pump house to look like a house. I doubt the neighborhood wants the department to build a bizarre simulacrum of a historic home. This overly literal interpretation seems to forget that historic neighborhoods also include outbuildings and structures such as...pump houses. Surely, the designers could consider riffing off of these architectural examples, rather than continue insisting that we want them to build a fake home (which they, and we, don't want to do).

 

2) Speaking of being overly literal, I'd like to second some of the commission's suggestions that the architects stop fixating on their desire to make the utility building look like a utility building. I thought it was interesting that when the CRSA project manager was directly asked why he wanted to make sure it looked like a utility building, he gave no answer, only that they wanted to do it that way. There are many arguments that can be made regarding the relationships between form and function, but he couldn't make even one. Maybe this is a sign they could reconsider their insistence that the utility building absolutely must look like a utility building.

 

3) I very sincerely appreciate that the generator has been removed from the project, as well as the exterior fencing. Well done.

 

4) I also support the commission's observations that the detailing of the suggested building is subpar. While the PM insisted that the location of the doors and driveway match the pattern of what is in the neighborhood, I can't help but notice that we have no large, metal, industrial doors on our street; no fixed translucent windows; or many exposed utility boxes. I don't buy his argument.

 

5) Finally, I noted with great interest that the department is considering myriad options for the project, including not building the structure and instead "turning the 30-year well into a 75-year well," as well as relocating it elsewhere.

 

I'm very happy to hear that the department is considering these options! Perhaps they could consider discussing them with us more (rather than avoiding the conversation, as they seemed inclined to do). Thank you for taking the time to read this feedback. I appreciate it.

Cecile Paskett

March 4, 2019

Please don't build this facility. The Canyon Rd parks are a city treasure and building an industrial building in the park and cutting down great big trees would be seriously damaging to the neighborhood. It is extremely rare for a city to have such beautiful public green space so close to the central business district. The Canyon Rd parks create a lovely natural corridor for people to enjoy as they walk from downtown and temple square to Memory Grove park.

 

There is no way this project would be allowed to get even this far if it was a private entity trying to build an industrial or commercial building in this neighborhood. The SLC public utilities should have to abide by the same rules and scrutiny that any individual or company would have to work within. SLC public utilities has wanted to build this building from the beginning with not serious consideration given to alternatives. When pressed about other alternatives the answers have been a long the lines of "that's not feasible" with not details or facts to back them up.

 

There are always other options but SLC public utilities has shown that they don't have any desire to seriously explore those options. They want their building and they want to put it in the middle of a beautiful and historic park. Truly a disappointment and a disservice to the citizens of Salt Lake City. I can only hope that other branches of our government care more about preserving our city's treasures and will stop SLC public utilities desire to harm the Canyon Road parks.

Sean McKenna

March 4, 2019

I had hoped to see better then the lowest common denominator of architecture for the historic Memory Grove site. The community including my family wants to see real lasting Design not another ugly utility building . This is an opportunity for greatness, Find a firm or architect up for the challenge.

William Littig

March 4, 2019

I suggest that if this has to be built - no other alternative - then do the whole outside in rock so it looks old and have vines growing on it. It would be fun to make one of the walls a climbing rock wall so that it would be an entertaining feature. My other suggestion was to move it into the old firehouse across the road.

Bonnie Athas

March 4, 2019

The picture posted on the design of the pump house is UGLY and DOES NOT fit in with the neighborhood. (Think of an abandoned Jiffy Lube covered with ivy (also 20 yrs of growth later) trying to mask the obscenity of what is trying to be imposed in this historic neighborhood!). It is also very misleading with grown trees lining the street around it. It may have trees that size after 50 years, but will look barren for at least 2 decades. FACT. We have perfectly healthy, lovely 110 yr old trees that should be protected! There is a lot of intelligence and talent on the committee. Figure out a solution that saves our trees and enhances the neighborhood!!

Lisa

March 2, 2019

I was told that the new well in Canyon Road will be using liquid chlorine. My question is regarding the type of chlorination used on site. Will the well be using pressure liquefied elemental chlorine (Cl2)? Or will the site be using Sodium Hyporclorite (NaOCl)? Any leak of Cl2 would be releasing pure chlorine gas, while Sodium Hypochlorite would be a liquid and evaporating at an equilibrium with the atmosphere (thus reducing the exposure of any potential workers, or bystanders in the area). Elemental chlorine gas definitely requires more safety precautions and LOP's (levels of protection). If using Chlorine gas, please explain the reason why an unmanned water treatment facility is opting the more hazardous process condition over the safer (requiring less expertise and safety precautions) NaOCl (liquid)/Ca(ClO)2 (solid pellets).

Alec

February 28, 2019

Hello, I've complained in the past about how Public Utilities has been handling their communication about this project to the public, and I have, yet again, another complaint. It looks like your crew set up a hose running across Canyon Rd. (at 216 N. Canyon Rd), protected by a metal speed bump thing and cones across the rest of the road, as part of the work you are doing on the pump house and trees. Unfortunately, it is NOT secured to the road and our car is not an SUV; thus, it does not have high clearance. Because of how this was set up, the metal bridge/speedbump flipped up and scraped the hell out of the bottom of our car, despite us driving as slowly as possible.

 

Are there any signs warning drivers that low-clearance vehicles should use another route? Nope. Was there any warning to residents that the road would be blocked off like this? No. Oh, and we aren't the only ones affected – watching the street, all people with low-clearance cars are stopping after driving over the speedbump, looking back at what they drove over, looking pissed off, and, for some, cursing. Again, SLC Public Utilities is handling its communication to the public in the same way you did when this project first started – with an obvious lack of care or respect for how this work would impact the neighborhood. I want you to know 2 things: 1) If our car is damaged, we are absolutely holding you responsible and will sue for the cost to fix it. 2) If you feel like you are winning the neighborhood over by how you are handling this project, I think you need to reevaluate yourselves and your work. I've already called Chris Tabor about the shoddy work his crew did at setting this road blockage up. I have not heard back. I assure you that you will be hearing from me again.

Cecile

Dear Ms. Paskett:

Thank you for your information. The section of work you reference in your email was completed on 2/28 and the equipment has been removed from the road. Below is information on the process for filing a claim against Salt Lake City. Thank you, and we hope this is helpful.

 

The website for the City Attorney’s Risk Management division, which can walk you through the process for filing a claim is here: https://www.slc.gov/attorney/risk/

 

You may also call by phone at: 801-535-7788

 

Or you may send an email directly and request a claim form: slcrisk@slcgov.com

(Please put “requesting a notice of claim form” in the email subject line.)

 

The form will give you directions for filing a claim, including narration, photos of alleged damage, etc.

Thank you again.

February 27, 2019

Being a resident of this neighborhood for 25 years I am highly invested in the character and well being of the City Creek Canyon Community. I am supportive of the well and working together to design an appropriately sized building to house and maintain it. I do not believe that a neighborhood setting is an acceptable location for any kind of chemical treatment of the water supply. I am hopeful that alternative creative solutions can be considered for this aspect of the project. I would also appreciate preservation of our beautiful trees to be a serious priority.

Linnea Noyes

February 25, 2019

The Proposed building's use is not Consistent with Residential Planning

I've attended all of the meetings in hopes that the City would work with the neighborhood. However, at every meeting the City is entrenched in its position and the plan moves forward. If a developer proposed this type of facility, the City would never allowed it to be built in a residential neighborhood. It is an industrial building in design and most importantly, in use, and should not be allowed in this residential neighborhood. We haven't even started talking about the affect upon the neighborhood's property values. We haven't started talking about the affect of chlorine gas upon children's asthma. You may scoff, but having had a child who could never swim in a chlorinated pool, chlorine is an asthma trigger. Chlorine gas is heavy and sinks, and the Canyon is the low spot, thus the availability of the water. This facility belongs elsewhere, not in a residential neighborhood.

Victoria Walker

February 27, 2019 (Updated Response)

Dear Ms. Walker:

Thank you for your email regarding the 4th Avenue Well.

 

Salt Lake City Public Utilities continues to post all relevant and accurate information regarding plans, communication, meetings, and FAQs on www.slc.gov/utilities/fourth-avenue-well-project/. Your question about chlorine is included on the FAQ page and reads like this:

 

Q: Would chemicals be stored on site?

 

A: Chlorine is proposed to be in liquid form to inject into the water at the site. Both chlorine and fluoride are regulated by the State Division of Drinking Water and Salt Lake County Health Department and are required in Salt Lake City’s water system (see Utah State Code R309-520-7 and Salt Lake Valley Health Department Health Regulation #33).

 

Chlorine gas has never been used at this well, and Salt Lake City Public Utilities does not use chlorine gas at its water treatment facilities in City Creek Canyon, Parley’s Canyon, or Big Cottonwood Canyon. The liquid chlorine would be delivered by truck to the 4th Avenue well. The strength of the liquid is approximately double that of household bleach. 

 

The liquid chlorine that would be injected at the site is needed to treat the water further down the pipeline. This injection process ensures against bacteria buildup in the distribution system as the water flows through the pipeline to customers.

 

We hope you will follow the planning process of the proposed pump house as it moves through the Historic Landmarks Commission. This information is also available on the “updates” link at the website. The architects on the project will address the HLC on March 7 beginning at 5:30 p.m. in the Salt Lake City Council work room. Questions of architectural appropriateness for the neighborhood will likely be addressed there.

 

SLC Public Utilities continues to listen to the community and to act as an honest broker in the discussions regarding the well. Since our earliest communication with the community, we have worked to address concerns, including reducing the original footprint of the project by nearly 30 percent. We have determined not to place a generator on site, which helps to cut the size of the pump house. We have been working closely with professional arborists and the Salt Lake City Forester in treating the trees on the site with utmost care and to minimize tree removal.

 

And, we are currently conducting a well inspection and a feasibility study, a process that grew out of listening and interacting with the neighborhood. When these findings become available we will promptly share it on this website and with the Greater Avenues Community Council.

 

Our team will continue to engage with the community to address aesthetic and historic interests in the area. We will do this while working to protect the public health and safety of 350,000 people (several thousand of whom benefit directly from the 4th Avenue well water) who depend on SLC Public Utilities for high-quality and abundant drinking water.​

 

Thank you for your continued interest.

February 26, 2019

Current Well Work

Please update what is going on right now. Will the rusty pipes be reinserted into the well or will they be replaced. When will the results of the Survey be available.

Craig S. Ogan

Dear Mr. Ogan:

 On Tuesday, February 26th, our well inspection team conducted a pre-cleaning video inside the well.

They also brushed the well for a few hours.

The process is proceeding well.

Thank you for your interest.

February 16, 2019

Save the trees and aesthetic of the avenues! We don’t want an eyesore in our neighborhood and we definitely don’t want to lose beautiful, living trees.

Tannith Dangerfield

Tannith,

The initial concept of the project has changed in size. We will reduce the project’s footprint significantly. The revised plan includes removal of the perimeter fence. In addition, there will be no on-site generator or fluoride room, as originally presented.  Although these changes will present Public Utilities workers with challenges in maintenance and operations, we know these are important concessions in reducing the size of the site and incorporating the project into the area.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

​Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

February 16, 2019

4th ave water station

Please don’t tear down those trees. It would be an environmental crime.

Michael Stewart

Michael,

The initial concept of the project has changed in size. We will reduce the project’s footprint significantly. The revised plan includes removal of the perimeter fence. In addition, there will be no on-site generator or fluoride room, as originally presented.  Although these changes will present Public Utilities workers with challenges in maintenance and operations, we know these are important concessions in reducing the size of the site and incorporating the project into the area.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

​Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

 

December 31, 2018

Fourth Avenue Well Pumphouse

Regarding December 13 Open House Thank you for sharing the most recent designs for the Fourth Avenue Well. I appreciate the efforts to shrink the footprint and save one of the trees in the park. Regarding the architectural design presented at the December 13 Meeting, the structure still seems to be closely resembling a simple brick and cinder block structure and does not at fit with the aesthetic of a historic neighborhood. A comment was made at the Open House by one of the project team that design factors were still prioritizing low cost and ease of construction (something along the lines of cheap and easy). Owning a home in the historic district does not allow any of its owners a cheap and easy solution for home improvements, maintenance, remodels, and construction. Falling back on cheap and easy does not sit well with residents who are not allowed the same liberty with improvements or maintenance of their properties.

When driving up Canyon Rd from Third Ave. from where the park begins, the pumphouse is in a prominent visual location, and will serve as an entry way feature. The presented design relies heavily on an ivy type vegetation to soften the aesthetic. This reliance on ivy is predicated on 1. that the ivy grows (and grows in thick); and 2. that the ivy or similar plants are maintained by the city for the lifetime of the pumphouse. Regarding item 1, the Pumphouse in Liberty Park likewise relies on ivy to soften its appearance, but that ivy did not appear terribly full in growth. Regarding item 2, having the main aesthetic feature being vegetation as opposed to aesthetic design seems shortsighted and too dependent on the growth, quality of growth, and quality of maintenance of the vegetation feature. Vegetation aesthetic softening is a great idea, but I am concerned that it is the only idea. I would prefer that 1. the well be relocated; 2. that if this is not possible, chemical treatment be relocated to keep the pump location as small as possible. However, if the pumphouse is to exist on location, this is a permanent feature that will permanently alter this location for the next 50+ years.

 

This should be a structure that the city and its residents are proud of, and view as an asset to the park, this neighborhood, and the city (beyond its utilitarian function). As Memory Grove and this park are frequented by hundreds if not thousands of visitors each year for the purpose of family and wedding photos, whatever structure that might be built for the Fourth Avenue Well Pumphouse should be one that people would want to have their wedding photos taken in front of for the next fifty years. Make a goal of making this a nationally award winning solution to a pumphouse situated in a prominent location of a treasured park within a historic neighborhood.

Winston Seiler

December 28, 2018

The construction of a water treatment building on the Canyon Road Parkway would be an eyesore and a travesty! It is a very poor decision to destroy beautiful trees and disrupt this tranquil and historic neighborhood! Not only will the residents suffer but all those who use Memory Grove! Please leave this beautiful and idyllic parkway alone! Find a different location!

Margo Butler

Margo,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

The initial concept of the project has changed in size. We will reduce the project’s footprint significantly. The revised plan includes removal of the perimeter fence. In addition, there will be no on-site generator or fluoride room, as originally presented.  Although these changes will present Public Utilities workers with challenges in maintenance and operations, we know these are important concessions in reducing the size of the site and incorporating the project into the area.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

​Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

December 23, 2018

Fourth Avenue Well Project

As you can see from my address, I live a half block from the well. I've lived here for almost two years. Prior to that, I lived further up Canyon Road for five years. What I find difficult to understand is the why the city is not held to the same standard/restrictions as any homeowner on Canyon Road or in a historic district is held to when wanting to renovate a home they own in the area. The standards are strict if you want to something as simple as upgrading original windows to ones that are more energy efficient, or do any kind of remodeling that affects the facade of a house that faces a street. Why in the world should it be any different for the city? A structure of any size on that site will destroy the neighborhood, affect property values and ruin the idyllic, charm of this historic neighborhood. I understand that there's a need for an upgrade. Certainly there has to be other options

Connie Buie

Connie,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

The initial concept of the project has changed in size. We will reduce the project’s footprint significantly. The revised plan includes removal of the perimeter fence. In addition, there will be no on-site generator or fluoride room, as originally presented.  Although these changes will present Public Utilities workers with challenges in maintenance and operations, we know these are important concessions in reducing the size of the site and incorporating the project into the area.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

​Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

December 21, 2018

Don’t Cut the Trees!

I live downtown because it coexists so nicely with nature. SLC government is usually so good at protecting the environment! This is something Provo would do. Don’t be like Provo.

Robbie Preece

Robbie,

The initial concept of the project has changed in size. We will reduce the project’s footprint significantly. The revised plan includes removal of the perimeter fence. In addition, there will be no on-site generator or fluoride room, as originally presented.  Although these changes will present Public Utilities workers with challenges in maintenance and operations, we know these are important concessions in reducing the size of the site and incorporating the project into the area.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

​Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

December 20, 2018

Memory Grove Well

Please do not cut down trees in Memory Grove for water treatment. This is absurd in the middle of this park. Chemicals and noise. There are not many places within the city like this and it needs to remain as is.

Clyde Trujillo

 

Clyde,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

The initial concept of the project has changed in size. We will reduce the project’s footprint significantly. The revised plan includes removal of the perimeter fence. In addition, there will be no on-site generator or fluoride room, as originally presented.  Although these changes will present Public Utilities workers with challenges in maintenance and operations, we know these are important concessions in reducing the size of the site and incorporating the project into the area.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

​Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

 

December 20, 2018

Water treatment plant on Canyon Road

That is a beautiful site & I walk my dog there frequently. I think a water treatment would be OUT OF PLACE there & RUIN THE ENTIRE AREA!!!!! I think it should be built further up City Creek Canyon.

 

Judy,
Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

​The initial concept of the project has changed in size. We will reduce the project’s footprint significantly. The revised plan includes removal of the perimeter fence. In addition, there will be no on-site generator or fluoride room, as originally presented.  Although these changes will present Public Utilities workers with challenges in maintenance and operations, we know these are important concessions in reducing the size of the site and incorporating the project into the area.

December 20, 2018

Fourth Avenue Well Project

Canyon Road Pump House

Please don’t make a lovely green park area a noisy, ugly, toxic eyesore which will sacrifice three, if not four, 100 year old sycamore trees. How could you think this to be a solution that the residents in the neighborhood would/could embrace. Surely there is a better solution to what I recognize as a problem (workers standing in water working on electrical.)

Richard Clegg

Richard

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

The initial concept of the project has changed in size. We will reduce the project’s footprint significantly. The revised plan includes removal of the perimeter fence. In addition, there will be no on-site generator or fluoride room, as originally presented.  Although these changes will present Public Utilities workers with challenges in maintenance and operations, we know these are important concessions in reducing the size of the site and incorporating the project into the area.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

​Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

 

 

December 19, 2018

Fourth Avenue Well Project

Proposed new pump house

4th Ave Well

Please maintain the character and beauty of the park which is a special place in the neighborhood. Please maintain as many of the established trees as possible.

Gina Roper

 

Gina,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

The initial concept of the project has changed in size. We will reduce the project’s footprint significantly. The revised plan includes removal of the perimeter fence. In addition, there will be no on-site generator or fluoride room, as originally presented.  Although these changes will present Public Utilities workers with challenges in maintenance and operations, we know these are important concessions in reducing the size of the site and incorporating the project into the area.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

​Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

 

December 19, 2018

Fourth Avenue Well Project

Proposed new pump house

It is appalling that Salt Lake City would even consider allowing this proposed monstrosity to be built on Canyon Rd. It would totally ruin one of the city's most beautiful neighborhoods, devalue private property, and create an eyesore at the entrance to Memory Grove, a sacred war memorial. Someone is taking the easy way out instead of doing the right thing. For shame! Change course now!

 

​J. Watson,
Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

​Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

 

 

December 16, 2018

Fourth Avenue Well Project

Fourth Ave Well

The HLC hopefully brought you back to the drawing board! This well will absolutely destroy the historic character of the city creek neighborhood if you build this mausoleum smack dab in the middle of the park. My opinions have been expressed many times on this site and I haven’t seen a single comment FOR the project. You simply cannot put it in the middle of a beautiful historic neighborhood! You’ll be negatively affecting property values of those who have spent a lot of time and money restoring their homes. And the beautiful, mature trees you want to destroy - that breaks my heart! With ALL residents opposing this, your job now is to find another solution. The well must go some where else. Period.

Lisa Miller

Lisa, 

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

 

December 16, 2018

Fourth Avenue Well Project

Response to August 30, 2018 comments

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the proposed 4th Avenue Well Upgrade. As I read through the alternatives and read that the City already has a back up pump, it seems that retaining the electrical submersible pump (ESP) system as is and bringing the electrical harness above ground should be a cost effective alternative. I work in the energy industry and ESPs are used reliably at depths greater than 5,000 feet routinely. Our understanding is this well is approximately 450 FT, significantly less than oil wells. This would allow the vault to be used as originally intended and then the new above ground structures would only need to house the electrical components. An additional suggestion would be to move the referenced needed chlorination to the lower park, further minimizing the impact to the community with two small structures. As a homeowner within 100 yards to the north, I have enjoyed the park

Alan J Walker

Alan, 

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

 

December 14, 2018

Fourth Avenue Well Project

The idea of building this structure over the well at this location is absurd beyond belief! This area is a welcoming respite from the city and a jewel that leads one to the continuation of process to Memory Grove and on to City Creek Canyon. This building, not matter how sensitive the design might be to the neighborhood will become a site barrier, destroy old growth trees, add a hum of noise not matter how low the DB's are and alter the park and it's connectivity to the neighborhood. There must be another location where the same goals could be achieved. I encourage you to put on your thinking hats and think outside of the box! Debra J Anderson

Debra,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

December 11, 2018

4th Avenue Well - Cara

I agree with the previous comments submitted on this site, about preserving the esthetics of this spot. This area is precious to local residents for its peace and natural beauty. Please don't damage these stately trees and surroundings. If there must be additional machinery or structures, place them underground. Better yet, treat the water in a different location, if you can find any way to do so.

Cara,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. We are working on plans to allow saving as many trees as we can.

Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. 

Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed including the fluoride room. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

 

December 7, 2018

Fourth Avenue Well - Carlton A Getz

It's good to hear that the city has taken into account serious concerns about the detrimental impact of the original proposal on the area. I would suggest considering options to adjust the footprint of the building into the area of Fourth Avenue that already divides the two parks, possible narrowing the road or making it one way and further minimizing the impact on trees and parkland.

 

Carlton, 

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. We are working on plans to allow saving as many trees as we can.

Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

Thank you for visiting our site and for expressing your response. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

 

December 7, 2018

Fourth Avenue Pump Comments - Stephanie G Bauman

Hi there, we are confused why the new station will have to have a full water treatment set up with fluoride when the well is clean enough without and grandfathered in. please don't put chemicals in our pure water. Thank you.

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

Please visit our updates page for additional information about design elements that have changed including the fluoride room. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

December 6, 2018

Fourth Avenue Well - David Porter

Not only do I live just a block away from the proposed treatment site, but I used to rent an apartment directly across from it. That park is a special place to so many people who walk up from downtown at their lunch break, or who live nearby and go there as a respite from the city. Placing a treatment plant there would profoundly alter the entire neighborhood, and I find it shocking that it is even being considered. Please find another solution and drop this idea immediately.

Sincerely, David

David,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. We are working on plans to allow saving as many trees as we can.

Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

Thank you for visiting our site and for expressing your response. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

Please visit our updates page for information about the upcoming open house we are hosting with the SLC Planning Division. We will meet at the Marmalade Library on 300 West and 500 North on Thursday, December 13 from 5:30 to 8 p.m.

December 6, 2018

4th Avenue Well - Craig S Ogan

What is the budget for development and construction of the 4th Avenue and Canyon Road project?

Craig,

The construction was planned to be this winter, but it is postponed while we seek more public input and modify the design to better fit the historic nature of the neighborhood. $3,000,000 was budgeted for the fiscal year, 2019 this budget was based on the original design.  Changes to the design may change the budget and at this point we are waiting to get a final design concept.

 

December 6, 2018

4th Avenue Well - Catherine Burton

Memory Grove and the surrounding area and trees are a treasure and to be left as is. There must be 100 other solutions. Please find another location. thanks!

Catherine, 

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. We are working on plans to allow saving as many trees as we can.

Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

Thank you for visiting our site and for expressing your response. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

December 6, 2018

Fourth Avenue Well - Cynthia Dayton

I recently moved to the Salt Lake Avenues from Provo. As a city council woman in Provo for many years, I admired the great lengths Salt Lake officials went to in providing livable and esthetically beautiful parks and stopping places. Quality of life seemed to matter. I often went to the State Capitol building and each time I drove by the little park at the foot of the steep drive to the Capitol, I was genuinely surprised and jealous that here, in the middle of a metropolis, was a remarkably beautiful place.

 

Stopped at the light, I would often observe people walking through, sitting, looking over the bridge, and children playing. I never realized it was just a pocket park. And I also never looked at the towering brick walls of the surrounding apartment buildings. I actually thought it was an incredibly beautiful entrance to a full sized park. It was so inviting. I also never realized that only a few blocks away was another jewel of the city, Memory Grove and City Creek Canyon. From a utilitarian perspective, clean water is essential. But as a former city representative, I also know there are other places that may in the short run be more expensive, but not so critical to the overall importance of an area.

 

I believe that the change in focus to utilitarian will stop local citizens from frequenting the area, and will increase the vagrant population usage as has been seen in other cities. It will provide yet another wall for graffiti. It will lose it’s appeal in natural beauty and with that it will also no longer be a place for neighbors and visitors to rejuvenate. Quality of life and safety are connected. I know that when an area, which once had appeal changes focus, it is also seen as unsafe and is avoided. It seems to me that how Salt Lake deals with this will be a long time indicator to other cities of what this city is focused on and, as a citizen of Utah, whether or not the State of Utah cares about quality of life issues.

 

The placement of the city water treatment not only adversely affects the local resident’s quality of life but also the image and entrance to the Capitol Building of our state. And it prepares those like me, who look up the road to visit with our representatives and Governor with a sense of trust that needs will be considered. It let me look up the road with less tension and concern as I learned from our Capitol City what a city can and should do for its citizens. It helps us remember that long-term interest means meeting the needs of not only water treatment, but the next generation needs of family and community.

 

Since it is the responsibility of the Municipal Council to focus on the health, safety and general welfare of the citizens who live here, please consider how this change will affect those who use those sidewalks, sit under the trees and walk safely into the city at night. And consider the message of how Salt Lake City considers respite and visual beauty to enhance the general welfare for not only one city, but also the state. Please reconsider the decision and the lasting effects on the community. Sincerely, Cynthia Dayton

 

Dear Ms. Dayton:

Thank you for reaching out to us with your concerns. And thank you for your service to Provo as a former city council member.  We are glad you have decided to make Salt Lake City your home.

Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities and the Division of Planning are working closely to provide the entire City, as well as the neighborhood nearest the 4th Avenue Well, a quality product that fits the scale and aesthetic of the area. During a robust engagement period over the past five months, we have discussed the project and listened carefully to many opinions. We have taken these points seriously and have, in fact, made significant changes to the initial plan for the well house upgrade.

We believe these changes will address many of the concerns you have cited about the project’s potential for altering the peace and beauty of the area. Like you, we know that clean water, fire safety, and protecting the public health and our workers’ safety are critical to a functioning municipal government. These are the needs driving the update to the well house.

In recent weeks, due in large part to our gathering of neighborhood feedback, the following changes have been made to the project plan. They will be more fully shared and discussed at a public open house on Thursday, December 13, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Salt Lake City’s Marmalade Branch Library. The address is 300 West and 500 South.

  • ​The initial concept of the project has changed in size. We will reduce the project’s footprint significantly. The revised plan includes removal of the perimeter fence. In addition, there will be no on-site generator or fluoride room, as originally presented.  Although these changes will present Public Utilities workers with challenges in maintenance and operations, we know these are important concessions in reducing the size of the site and incorporating the project into the area.

  • The chlorine room will remain as part of the design and project, as chlorination is necessary to protect public health and safety.

  • Public Utilities has retained two local and respected architects to draw plans for the site: David Triplett and John Ewanowski, of CRSA Architecture. CRSA was co-founded by longtime restoration architects Wally Cooper and Allen Roberts. Mr. Triplett has decades of experience in designing functional buildings that also meet historic and aesthetic standards. Mr. Ewanowski has strong background in restoring older and historically significant buildings to modern functionality. Some Capitol Hill and Avenues residents have already voiced their approval of CRSA and these architects, specifically. The architectural drawings of the 4th Avenue Well project, informed by residents’ opinions, will be available to the public at the December 13 open house, and will be widely shared with all City residents through social media platforms and traditional media outlets. ​

  • Our top priorities remain worker and public safety. Worker safety and code compliance will be met through electrical upgrades and by bringing the well house above ground. We will continue to address public safety by providing high-quality drinking water for the City and sufficient pressure within the water system for fire control. This well produces up to 7 million gallons of water a day. Its output was essential to providing enough water and pressure for our firefighters to extinguish three serious fires in the Capitol Hill area last summer—including the Ensign Peak fire that came dangerously close to several homes.       

  • SLC Public Utilities and Planning representatives will continue to work with neighborhoods surrounding the well site to provide a functional project at a scale that supports the district’s historic aesthetic.

The team planning the 4th Avenue Well project is committed to providing a safe and clean building and in respecting the area surrounding it. The well house will be built to appropriate scale and will fit within the neighborhood historic aesthetic—while still providing abundant, high-quality water to thousands of City residents and businesses. We look forward to continuing outreach with residents over the next several months. We hope to meet you at the December 13 open and to discuss the project further.

 

December 6, 2018

Water well on 4th avenue - Ray Wilmot

I am totally opposed to the proposal to build a gigantic treatment plant in City Creek Canyon. This area, where 4th Avenue meets Canyon Road, is a priceless treasure in Salt Lake City. It needs to remain as it is.

 

Ray,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

Our team is also committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. We are working on plans to allow saving as many trees as we can. Thank you for visiting our site and for expressing your response. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

December 6, 2018

Design of the fourth avenue well facility - Octavia Haines

With the priority being to preserve the magnificent trees, design a facility that will accomplish your needs. What's your best effort? I look forward to hearing how you address this issue.

Sincerely,

Octavia

Octavia,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Our team is committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. We are working on plans to allow saving as many trees as we can.

Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

Thank you for visiting our site and for expressing your response. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

 

December 4, 2018

4th Avenue Well Project - Ivan Weber

Dear SLC Public Utilities Department, Mayor and City Council:  It's nearly impossible to dispute the need for code-compliant, health protective (including worker health, as well as public)  City-aware planning and design, and neighborhood-respecting sense of Value. Of these four categories of concerns, however, the current plan/design for the 4th Avenue well upgrade only approaches the first two, falling drastically short on the third and fourth.

 

Let's cut to the chase:  My Wife, Linda C. Smith, has spoken up about her concerns previously, "live" at public meetings --- which appear from here to have been successfully suppressed by Public Utilities and City administrative authorities.  It is through Linda that I have established a rather deep (if I say so myself) connection to this specific block of City Creek Canyon/Canyon Road:

1.  Linda grew up living in the house at 211 Canyon Road, where her parents settled around the time of WWII.  Her Father was Chauncey Call, and her Mother, Ardell Call.  Linda, the extremely long-time Executive/Artistic Director of Repertory Dance Theatre (RDT) and her brother sold 211 Canyon Road during the past year to the civic-minded  Winsness family, who live there. 

 

2.  Linda and I own 217 Canyon Road and, across the street, 218 Canyon Road, which is mostly inhabited by our Son, Evan Smith, and his family, with a rental unit in the lower floor.  217 Canyon Road consists of three rental floors divided into two units.  I spent about twelve years of my life in the 1970s and 1980s remodeling these two houses to the best of my craftmanship standards, which some recognize as significant.  They were the best that I could do with the funds we could muster, supported wonderfully by Linda's parents at 211.  All of these family properties would be eclipsed by the 4th Avenue Well facilities!

 

We are, and have been for time out of mind, utterly committed to the civic beauty and integrity of this block of the best that Downtown Salt Lake City has to offer.  It is patently beautiful, peaceful, and calm, representing arguably the best that Salt Lake City has to offer.

 

To cut to the chase, may we ask what value the City attaches to this set of properties?  We hold it to be in the range of multiple millions of dollars, when reduced to strictly monetary valuation, but much, much more than that when valued in URBAN value terms.  All the expressions of objections to the plan that have appeared in press and City publications state facets of these values, but there is an entire category that is missing:  Best Planning and Design.

 

Were the City Public Utilities Department to apply the very best standards and expectations possible, the entire facility would be put below street level, with rigorous ventilation and uncompromising access built to allow avoidance of tree destruction, avoidance of compromise of sight lines, avoidance of impairment of well piping functions, and avoidance of loss of functionality --- even if the well must be divided into multiple facilities and scattered beneath the streets, beneath the stairs at each transverse axis terminus (where pedestrians ascend to each 4th Avenue connection), and utterly anything else that decreases the values for which residents aspired so profoundly as they improved properties over the decades --- as we and others did facing the park that makes up the collective front yard.

 

You have the opportunity to commit a terrible crime against the City and against the Regional Culture by building this over-engineered, completely insensitive facility as proposed; ALTERNATIVELY, you have the opportunity to elicit and to collect the best ideas and sensitive comments, plans and designs that the residents of this Community can produce --- and THEN consolidate, plan and design a solution to the problem.  Maybe it's not a "problem" worth solving as stated; maybe the problem can be re-stated, and addressed in these more sane terms.

 

The one thing we can assure the City Public Utilities Department is that, if you proceed, it will be necessary for us to engage a very competent attorney in order for us to proceed alongside you.

 

Please be in touch.  We are resolved to do all we can to help, as long as Salt Lake City does not hold the City Center and the Canyon Road Neighborhood in contempt, as it appears to be doing at present.

 Ivan Weber and Linda C. Smith

Dear Mr. Weber:​ 

 We received your email regarding the 4th Avenue Well project, and value the opportunity to update you on the latest information. Our work has been informed by active listening to residents, and engaging in civil and healthy dialogue in several public meetings. Thank you for reaching out. 

 

We would like to invite you and your wife Linda to an upcoming open house we are hosting with the SLC Planning Division. We will meet at the Marmalade Library on 300 West and 500 North on Thursday, December 13 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. The following information will be available and representatives from Planning and Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities (SLCDPU) will be there to provide information and updates:

 

  • ​The initial concept of the project has changed significantly in recent weeks. The City has taken residents' concerns seriously, and being informed by this dialogue has led us to significantly reduce the site's footprint. The revised plan includes removal of the perimeter fence. In addition, there will be no on-site generator or fluoride room, as originally presented.  Although these changes will present SLCDPU workers with challenges in maintenance and operations, we know these are important concessions in reducing the size of the site and incorporating the project into the area.

  • The chlorine room will remain as part of the design and project, as chlorination is necessary to protect public health and safety.

  • SLCDPU has retained two local and respected architects to draw plans for the site: David Triplett and John Ewanowski, of CRSA Architecture. You may know of them or the firm, founded by Wally Cooper and Allen Roberts. Mr. Triplett has decades of experience in designing functional buildings that also meet historic and aesthetic standards. Mr. Ewanowski has strong background in restoring older and historically significant buildings to modern functionality. Their plans for the 4th Avenue Well project, informed by residents' feedback, will be available to the public at the December 13 open house, and will be  widely shared with all City residents through social media platforms and traditional media outlets.​

 

  • ​Our top priorities remain worker and public safety. Worker safety and code compliance will be met through electrical upgrades and by bringing the well house above ground. We will continue to address public safety by providing high-quality drinking water for the City and sufficient pressure within the water system for fire control. SLCDPU and Planning representatives will continue to work with neighborhoods surrounding the well site to provide a functional project at a scale that support the district's historic aesthetic.

 

We appreciate your engagement in this project and hope to see you on December 13.

November 29, 2018

CRSA Architects Plans – Craig S Ogan

1 Are they designing the facility for the Preferred option #3 from the consultants? We think it would be a good idea to look at a design for Option 1 (limited functionality)

2 Kelsey said there would be an open house to look at the designs, do you have a day and time for that?

 

Craig,

Thank you for reaching out to us. With respect to the question about the design, we recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

 

As to your question about another Open House; in coming weeks, we plan to announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

November 20, 2018

4th Avenue well – Tim Brown

This is a significant, key gateway from Salt Lake City into the Avenues and City Creek Canyon. As a city we take pride in advertising our proximity to nature and no where is this more accessible than City Creek. As an Avenues resident, I travel past this area frequently whether returning home from work or walking downtown.

 

With this in mind, I urge the location and design of this structure to be well thought out. The initial design seemed to lack a sensitivity to the surrounding area and importance of this gateway. The location also seemed to be the most convenient but not necessarily the most ideal.

 

In Liberty Park an initial pump house was proposed to be adjacent to the pond and mimic a Rhode Island boathouse. After public comment a new location and design was proposed. The end result was much better for the millions of park users.

 

I hope that a similar outcome is possible.

 Hello Tim,

 Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

 

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

 

Our team is also committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. We are working on plans to allow saving as many trees as we can. Thank you for visiting our site and for expressing your response. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

November 14, 2018

4th Avenue Well Project - Raechel

Thank you for providing the opportunity to comment on the 4th Avenue well project. As a resident of this area, the Memory Grove park area is the heart of our community, and this specific area is the gateway to our city’s natural beauty. The loss of the mature trees and the addition of a 3000 square foot structure at this site would significantly diminish the area. I understand that it is necessary to upgrade the existing system and value the safety of utility workers. However, I think it is possible to develop a compromise. Could this well access site be moved to an area with less impact? Even moving this slightly up the canyon, could lessen the impact on the community while allowing safer access. If it is absolutely necessary to keep it at the current location, could the footprint size be smaller and could the architecture blend with the natural surroundings? The current 3000 square feet is a large structure. I understand there are difficult decisions to be made but ask that the major impact on the local community be considered. Many of us enjoy this area on a daily basis and it is a significant contributor to the quality of life and sense of community in our neighborhood. Thank you.

Raechel,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

 

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

 

Our team is also committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. We are working on plans to allow saving as many trees as we can. Thank you for visiting our site and for expressing your response. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

November 14, 2018

4th avenue well – Glenn G Williams

I oppose this project. The removal of the great trees; the building design I saw was ugly; and you're changing the character of that part of the aves for the worse. Don't do it.

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

 

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback.

 

Our team is also committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. We are working on plans to allow saving as many trees as we can. Thank you for visiting our site and for expressing your response. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

 

 

November 14, 2018

4th Avenue Well – Andy Peiffer

Tasteful wrought iron fence ??? :)

Not a fan of cutting down trees ..... COMPLETELY DISAGREE .... they probably soak up/grow on the leakage from this well.... a good thing

I'm sure that the highly-educated city engineers - city planners can figure out an alternate solution

My 2 cents

 

Hello Andy,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities is continuing to work directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully repurposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback. Our team is also committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code. We are working on plans to allow saving as many trees as we can.

Thank you for visiting our site and for expressing your response. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

 

November 9, 2018

4th Avenue Well – Kate Little

Building an above-ground water treatment facility at this location would desecrate the entrance to Memorial Grove. This park, with its access to nature and wilderness, proximate to the city center, is unique to Salt Lake City. We need to keep it the way it is - its peace and beauty is valuable to all citizens who live and work and visit the city center. The city should make repairs underground, and pump the water elsewhere for treatment.

 

Hello Ms. Little,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your comment about the 4th Avenue Well Project. Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities has been working directly with area residents as plans for the project take shape. We believe we can incorporate both function and appropriate design into a well house that supports worker safety, protects the public health, meets new state safety codes and fits with the history and aesthetics of the Avenues and Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

We recently added two architects to the project team from CRSA Architecture. This is a Salt Lake City firm with a strong track record for historic preservation and artfully re-purposing older buildings. In coming weeks, we will announce a public open house where we will share potential designs of the structure and invite community feedback. Our team is also committed to finding ways to minimize the footprint of the project, while still bringing this productive and vital well up to code.

Newer state safety codes (since 1948 when the well first began production) will no longer allow us to operate the well from underground. It is a threat to our workers’ safety to go into the well as it currently stands. We must bring the structure above ground.

Thank you for visiting our site and for expressing your response. We invite you to continue to visit regularly for updates, announcements and information regarding public meetings and outreach efforts.

 

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Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities

1530 West Temple

Salt Lake City, Utah 84115

801-483-6900

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